Small House of Everything

Small House of Everything

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

MUSIC FROM THE PAST: A WELL RESPECTED MAN

The Kinks, one of the reasons that made the Sixties so great.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WsmSgBRUe4

BAD JOKE WEDNESDAY

What's the difference between a chickpea and a potato?

Trump won't pay to have a potato on the bed.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

MUSIC FROM THE PAST: UP WHERE WE BELONG

Happy birthday to singer-songwriter and social activist Buffy Sainte-Marie!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLCk066o9sU

OVERLOOKED FILM: GENUINE: THE TALE OF A VAMPIRE (1920)

German director Robert Weine followed up his The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari with this expressionistic film which some feel to be the red-headed step-child of Caligari.  It's the story of a seductive woman named Genuine (Fern Andra) who is the non-blood sucking vampire of the title.  Genuine ends up in a slave market where she is purchased by an old man who keeps her in a cellar.  She vamps and seduces young men until one of them rouses the townspeople against her.

Sounds silly, doesn't it?

Wrapped in a glorious set design that harkens back to Caligari, this confusing and condensed public domain version of the film has few admirers.  It is of historic importance, however, and many of the technical aspects of the film are superb.

Also featured in the film are Hans Heinrich von Twardowski, Ernst Gronau, Harold Paulson, Albert Bennefeld, John Gottowt, and Louis Brody.

Carl Meyer, wrote also wrote Caligari for Weine, penned this one. 

A few words about Fern Andra.  The Illinois-born Andra began her career at four, when she performed a tightrope act.  After touring the U.S. and Europe, she settled in Germany to become one of the most popular actresses in German silent cinema. As World War I began, some considered her an allied spy because of her birth; to disprove this notion she married a titled Prussian who died in the war shortly after.  And she really was an allied spy during the war.  She went on to marry three other men, one of them twice.  She survived a plane crash which killed her director and the pilot, Lother von Trichthofen (the brother of Red Baron von Richthofen).  For her role in Genuine, artist Cesar Klein created a "costume" of full body paint for Andra.  From 1928 on she worked in the UK and the United States, expanding her repertoire to radio and television.  She died in 1974 in Aiken, south Carolina, at age 80.

I'm not sure if you will enjoy this, but give it a try.  It's less than 45 minutes.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1agMYcNNJPY&index=1&list=PLA11uteL7p_x1cipbjrVXc-dcGbRFuEew

Monday, February 19, 2018

MUSIC FROM THE PAST: SH-BOOM

The Chords.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBgQezOF8kY

BITS & PIECES

Openers:  Even when I woke up in the taxi, throat parched, eyes bleary, and found Sam Richard's corpse in the seat behind me, I couldn't believe it was real.  It was just a dream -- vague, half-remembered, even with the evidence of my own guilt staring me in the face.  -- Ken Lewis, "Honeymoon in Hell!" (Dime Mystery Magazine, January 1945)

I've Been Reading:  A Digit of the Moon, an oriental fantasy by F. W. Bain from 1899; The Bloody Spur, the third Caleb York western from Mickey Spillane and Max Allen Collins, engaging, but with a bit slower pace than the previous two books; The Grave's a Fine and Private Place, Alan Bradley's latest book about Flavia de Luce, the eleven-year-old (although she's probably twelve or thirteen by now) detective and expert on poisons; Stop the Presses!, the eleventh of twelve (so far) continuation of the adventure of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin by Robert Goldsborough, a decent read but somehow lacking Rex Stout's deft touch; Brother Men:  The Correspondence of Edgar Rice Burroughs and Herbert T. Weston, edited by Weston's great-grandson Matt Cohen and provides an interesting, albeit limited, look at both men who had been friends since their military school days; and Brian K. Vaughan's Saga, Volume Two and Volume Three, graphic novels from the award-winning series drawn by Fiona Staples.

The Kids Are Angry:  And that's a good sign.  Following the slaughter of seventeen students and teachers at the Marjory Stoneham Douglas High School, student survivors immediately called out our weak-kneed politicians and the NRA, demanding responsible gun control.  Their outrage has been picked up by students throughout the country, demanding change.  Five years ago, at Sandy Hook, twenty kids aged six and seven, as well as six adults, were murdered.  The kids who survived were not old enough to express their rage, only their hurt and confusion; their parents have done a remarkable job in fighting the madness, but they are adults -- which limits them.  The Stoneham Douglas kids are old enough to know what should be (and what should have been) done and are young enough to believe it can be done.  That is the rage that we need.  That is the rage that is infectious.  I look back at the Fifties and Sixties with the civil rights and anti-war movements and I see the seeds of another great movement now.  One Florida Republican, a former member of Congress, has supported voting out all Republicans so that the nation can move forward with sensible gun control.  The standard pro-gun comment whenever there is a mass shooting of now is not the time to politicize about gun control will no longer wash.  Ohio governor John Kasick, perhaps eyeing another presidential run and seeing which way the wind blows, has deleted the pro-gun section from his website.  And as for the men hiding behind the it's-not-a-gun-issue-it's-a-mental-health-issue curtain, I just look to something I saw on the internet this week:  "Isn't it strange how mental illness hardly massacres anyone in Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom?"  (I'm even willing to excuse the lack of an Oxford comma.)  The kids are calling for school strikes, walk-outs, and marches to help get their message across.  Yep, the kids are angry and rightly so.  I, for one, am glad.

The Black Panther:  Outperformed expectations.  Whose expectations?  Not mine.  Not those of anyone I know.  Methinks the industry analysts who had lower expectations knew not of what they spoke.

On This Day:  The Supreme Privy Council was was established in Russia (1726).  I looked it up and it is definitely not what I thought it was.  And in 1913, Pedro Lascurain became President of Mexico.  His term lasted all of 45 minutes.  We should be so lucky.

Speaking of Presidents:  It's their day.  No presidents were born in my hometown of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, but the father of one was.  The story goes that the father of Franklin Pierce was 14 when the Battles of Lexington and Concord were fought.  The young boy grabbed his rifle, said, "Ma, I hear the shots," and set off for the fray.  Lexington and Concord are three and two towns over from Chelmsford and Pierce's home was in the part of Chelmsford that was later ceded to Lowell so, in effect, young master Pierce was four and three towns away from the fighting.  How could he hear the rifle fire?  Could this particular story be apocryphal?

Speaking of Apocryphal:  Chelmsford had another Revolutionary War hero.  His name escapes me and I can't be bothered to look it up, but this guy claimed to be the man who fired the first shot at Bunker Hill and to my knowledge his claim has never been denied.  He evidently would repeat his claim at local taverns, which makes be wonder if he was blitzed when he pulled the trigger at Bunker Hill.  Don't fire until you see the double of the whites of their eyes!

Happy 75th, Lou Christie:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyRqdzF8swY

Poor Fashion Judgement:  You can also file this under EW!  28-year-old model turned fashion blogger Tracy Kiss has used her private parts to create designer jewelry.  I will not go into detail except to note that glitter was also used.  You can read about it here: 

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tracy-kiss-labia-necklace_us_59d2908ee4b048a443246042

And how was your week?

Sunday, February 18, 2018

OCTAVIA BUTLER ON CHARLIE ROSE, A 2000 INTERVIEW

A greatly missed and powerful writer...

Not one of Charlie Rose's best interviews, but Octavia Butler shines!


Part One of the interview:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66pu-Miq4tk


And Part Two:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1W9CNwl2e8